Resource

Black Suffragists

An article written by Adella Hunt Logan and published in the NAACP’s magazine, The Crisis. It includes reasons why the vote was particularly important to Black women.

The first page of an article written by Adella Hunt Logan outlining the reasons why Black women should have and use the vote.
Colored Women as Voters, 1/2

“Colored Women as Voters.” The Crisis, September 1912. The Modernist Journals Project: Brown University and the University of Tulsa.

The second page of an article written by Adella Hunt Logan outlining the reasons why Black women should have and use the vote.

Colored Women as Voters, 2/2

“Colored Women as Voters.” The Crisis, September 1912. The Modernist Journals Project: Brown University and the University of Tulsa.

Background

Not all suffragists were white middle-class women. Black suffragists like Mary Church TerrellIda B. Wells, and Fannie Barrier Williams played an important role in the fight for woman suffrage. Black suffragists had the double challenge of fighting both gender and racial stereotypes. Large national organizations like the National American Women Suffrage Association invited select Black leaders to attend meetings or speak at conventions. But most Black suffragists did not enjoy this experience. As the national woman suffrage movement focused on courting white, native-born supporters, Black women formed their own suffrage organizations. These organizations empowered Black women not only to fight for the vote, but also to bring attention to the wider struggles of the Black community. Black women argued that the vote would make them powerful enfranchised citizens in a nation divided by race.