Resource

Life Story: Linda Moy Chin (1932-2006)

Immigrant, Daughter, Sister, Wife, Mother, and American Citizen

This resource is adapted from the New-York Historical Society’s Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion curriculum.

Linda Moy Chin and Her Husband

Linda Moy Chin and Her Husband. Courtesy of the Family of Linda and Pang F. Chin.

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Linda (Lun Chee Moy) and Pang Fook Chin shortly after their marriage, with brother Pang Dick Chin in his school uniform, Toisan, China

Linda (Lun Chee Moy) and Pang Fook Chin shortly after their marriage, with brother Pang Dick Chin in his school uniform, Toisan, China, 1948. Courtesy of the Family of Linda and Pang F. Chin.

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Linda Moy Chin at Airport

Linda Moy Chin at Airport. Courtesy of the Family of Linda and Pang F. Chin

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Suggested Activities

  • Use Linda’s story to help students to explore how national policy like the Immigration and Nationality Act shaped the lives of individuals. Connect this to other immigration-related resources in WAMS, including the photograph of Japanese picture brides, the life story of Edith Maude Eaton, and the article “Woman without a Country.” 
  • Chinese immigrants like Linda and Pang faced a great deal of suspicion because of China’s connections to Communism. Link Linda’s story to life story to that of Helen Gahagan Douglas to consider two different ways anti-communist sentiment shaped people’s lives in the 1940s and 1950s. 
  • Linda’s family plays a central role in the New-York Historical Society’s Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion curriculum. Explore “Unit 3: A Journey of Unforgetting” for a wealth of primary sources connected to Linda and her family. 
  • Invite students to learn more about Linda and her family through the graphic novel Meet the Chin Family, a part of the Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion curriculum.

Themes

AMERICAN IDENTITY AND CITIZENSHIP; IMMIGRATIONM, MIGRATION, AND SETTLEMENT

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